Tag Archive: 0bindings

Two little block printed gems

Two little block printed gems

5th June 2019

As readers of this blog and members of We Love Endpapers know, Simon is always on the lookout for new and unusual decorated papers. Recently, he came across a fantastic example of Italian block-printed endpapers on a little Armenian book…

In blind-stamped velvet

In blind-stamped velvet

15th May 2019

In anticipation of Firsts, we thought we would highlight one of our favourite ‘firsts’: a first edition, first issue of Chroniques Françoises de Jacques Gondar (Paris, Firmin Didot for Louis Janet, 1830), in a stunning blind-stamped velvet binding…

An 18th-century dust-wrapper

An 18th-century dust-wrapper

19th April 2018

A fascinating survival: the plates for the first volume of Georgi’s Beschreibung aller Nationen des Russischen Reichs (4 vols, 1776–80), ‘the first demographic study of the peoples of Russia’ (Howgego I-G36), still loose and yet to be coloured, in the printed sheet they were wrapped in as they left the printshop.  Translations of Georgi’s book, […]

Binding variants

Binding variants

4th August 2015

This is something I have been thinking about for a while.  Antiquarian booksellers are always concerned with rarity, and look books up to see who else has a copy, either currently for sale, in a library somewhere, or perhaps offered once at an auction.  Obviously, just because you find another copy, doesn’t make it the […]

An ‘American’ bindery in the Crimea

An ‘American’ bindery in the Crimea

15th July 2015

Sometimes a book ends up posing questions which you, as a bookseller, simply cannot answer.  I enjoy the research aspects of what I do, but I recognise that I cannot know everything, and also that the books I offer for sale must provide further possibilities for research for the customer, whether private collector or special collections library.  Here is an example: This binder’s stamp […]

Three Men in a Boat encounter Russian pirates

Three Men in a Boat encounter Russian pirates

3rd September 2014

This year is the 125th anniversary of the first appearance of Three Men in a Boat, published by J. W. Arrowsmith in Bristol (who, three years later, was to bring out that other classic comic novel, George and Weedon Grossmith’s The Diary of a Nobody).  Although slated by some critics at the time, the book sold […]