Tag Archive: 0fictitious imprints

Far from Thanksgiving

Far from Thanksgiving

26th November 2014

I had quite a bit of interest when I wrote about this book over on The New Antiquarian, so thought I’d share it here, too.  I’ve written before about a fictitious Boston imprint.  That book had no obvious connection with the United States, but this one does: it’s an early satire on emigration to America, from 1818. […]

The unfortunate queen

The unfortunate queen

26th August 2014

Princess Caroline Matilda (1751–1775), the youngest sister of George III, was married off to her cousin, Christian VII of Denmark, when she was only 15.  It was not a happy marriage.  Christian was a mentally unstable philanderer who claimed it was ‘unfashionable to love one’s wife’, and Caroline eventually drifted into an affair with the […]

A double-take book

A double-take book

13th February 2014

Sometimes, as a bookseller, you come across a book which makes you do a double take.  Here’s one I discovered recently: Briefe über den Verlust der Regenten und Völker Europens an, und durch Frankreichs Republik (pp. [2], 66), with the imprint ‘London 1798.  In allen Buchhandlungen Deutschlands in Englischer, Französicher und Deutscher Sprache zu haben.’  It’s […]

The first book published in ‘California’

The first book published in ‘California’

22nd October 2012

This very rare book, a biting satire on Poland (its form of government, parliament, laws, military, society, women, dirtiness, duelling, etc.), is the first book to be published with a ‘California’ imprint, preceding the first book actually printed in California by over 50 years (Reglamento provicional, Monterey, 1834).  It was in fact printed in Berlin. […]