Tag Archive: 0humour

Faust as Satire

Faust as Satire

30th April 2020

Among the Faust–related items included in our Anglo-German Cultural Relations catalogue, item 214 may be the most charming. Faust and ‘Phisto is a cheeky example of Victorian Goetheana that appeared in the Sixteenth Season of Beeton’s Christmas Annual (London, Ward, Lock, and Tyler, 1875). ‘In “Faust and ’Phisto” Goethe’s famous creation will be adapted and […]

Fun and games in the British Museum Reading Room

Fun and games in the British Museum Reading Room

25th October 2017

I’m just putting together my list for the forthcoming Boston Book Fair, as my books will be leaving early next week.  It’s always nice to be able to show new stock, freshly catalogued, and I shall have quite a bit with me.  As a taster, here’s one little item which caught my eye over the […]

The new opportunities of lithography

The new opportunities of lithography

25th November 2016

I’m currently putting together a list on Music, to be sent out next week.  One item in particular brings together a number of things which interest me: a) music, b) illustration, c) lithography, d) provincial imprints, e) private printing: Lithography, as Michael Twyman notes, was largely neglected by British music publishers in the first four decades […]

Bloody satire

Bloody satire

8th November 2016

I was looking for something election-related for today’s blogpost.  I wrote about a couple of very nice items connected to the Russian 1906 (parliamentary) election a few years ago, but I don’t think I’ve shared this before: It’s a merciless (and rather bloodthirsty) satire of the Radical-Socialist Édouard Herriot and the Cartel des gauches during […]

The flying kennel

The flying kennel

17th March 2016

A friend on Facebook pointed out a recent piece on fake places that only exist to catch copycat mapmakers.  ‘If a competitor just so happens to have the same fake town on their map, then you’ve pretty much caught them red-handed.’  It reminded me of something similar in a book I have: The Oxford-Duden Pictorial […]

Crash-landed in North Carolina

Crash-landed in North Carolina

19th September 2014

A few weeks ago, I wrote about a fictitious Boston imprint from 1777.  Here’s something in the same vein, or so I first thought: a German novel from c.1789, written by Johann Wolfgang Andreas Schöpfel (1752–1827).  Inspired by the craze for balloon travel that hit Europe and America in the 1780s, it opens with a balloon flight from Versailles which ends […]