Tag Archive: 0inscribed

Inscribed by Queen Victoria

Inscribed by Queen Victoria

25th February 2020

The story of Anglo-German cultural relations is inextricably linked with the British royal family, particularly in the Victorian era. This connection is perhaps most apparent in item of 204 of Anglo-German Cultural Relations (also listed as no. 16 in our New York book fair list): an inscribed copy of the first edition of German Hymns […]

Apparently unrecorded

Apparently unrecorded

25th October 2019

October is drawing to a close, which means here in Chesham we are inundated with fireworks (for Diwali) as well as book fair preparation (for the Boston fair). Equally exciting, but the latter is perhaps more pertinent to this blog. This year we are bringing some fantastic things, including an apparently unrecorded book; privately printed […]

Inscribed to Amelia Opie

Inscribed to Amelia Opie

28th November 2018

It’s Wednesday, and we’re having an Amelia Opie moment here at 84 The Broadway.  And why not?  She ticks all the boxes: Romantic novelist, abolitionist, pal of Sarah Siddons and Mary Wollstonecraft, married to a feminist, accomplished musician…the list goes on…

A blind lexicographer

A blind lexicographer

18th May 2018

I have long been interested in dictionaries, even before I completed my MA in Lexicography twenty years ago.  One book we shall be exhibiting at the London Rare Book Fair next week is this: It’s a copy of the first edition of Trésor des origines et dictionnaire grammatical raisonné de la langue française (1819).  Although […]

For Fauré

For Fauré

12th November 2012

Tchaikovsky was rather pleased with this, his first suite for orchestra (1879).  He wrote to his publisher, Pyotr Jurgenson: ‘Unless I am very much mistaken, it should have a success that will spread rapidly.’  He was obviously still pleased with it some years later, deeming it good enough as a present for none other than the great French […]

The scholar–book thief

The scholar–book thief

16th October 2012

Here are two of Plutarch’s Moralia, published from twelfth-century manuscripts in the Synodal Library in Moscow in 1777 by the German philologist Christian Friedrich Matthäi, and dedicated to Ivan Shuvalov, the Maecenas of the Russian Enlightenment. In 1772, the 28-year-old Matthäi took up a teaching post in Moscow.  Within four years he had become an associate professor […]