Tag Archive: 0lithography

Cross-dressing circus performer turned novelist

Cross-dressing circus performer turned novelist

29th March 2017

One of the (almost daily) joys of working with old books is discovering something you never knew before.  With this book, a novel published in Berlin, 1862–3, it was a new author: Emil Mario Vacano.  Often cited in histories of gay writing, Vacano (1840–1892) is certainly ‘one of the strangest literary figures of the nineteenth […]

Lovely litho

Lovely litho

9th December 2016

The past couple of weeks I have written about the opportunities offered by lithography to British musicians in the nineteenth century, and the problems they also encountered. One of the obvious benefits of the new medium was illustration, and a number of recent acquisitions set me thinking about this: This song was published c.1820, i.e. […]

The new opportunities of lithography

The new opportunities of lithography

25th November 2016

I’m currently putting together a list on Music, to be sent out next week.  One item in particular brings together a number of things which interest me: a) music, b) illustration, c) lithography, d) provincial imprints, e) private printing: Lithography, as Michael Twyman notes, was largely neglected by British music publishers in the first four decades […]

Liturgy and litigation

Liturgy and litigation

10th August 2016

It’s been a few years since I blogged about Tchaikovsky, but as I sang a movement from the following piece last night, it seems apt to write something today. This is a copy of the first edition of Tchaikovsky’s Liturgy of St John Chrysostom which, like his first suite for orchestra, was written in 1879. […]

‘In the most fashionable colours’

‘In the most fashionable colours’

19th May 2016

At the London International Antiquarian Book Fair next week, I shall be featuring a number of books printed on coloured paper on my stand.  Here’s a sneak preview of one: The Semiquaver was a charming privately-printed magazine, produced in 1869–70, in which each issue was lithographed on a different shade of vibrantly coloured paper. The writer/editor was a […]

Books in the balance

Books in the balance

5th May 2016

This large coloured lithograph, published in 1827, satirises Sir Walter Scott and how the Irish poet Thomas Moore pipped him to the post.  BM Satires explains: ‘A pair of scales hands unevenly.  In the upper scale sits Scott … supporting on his knees the nine volumes of his “Napoleon”.  He looks down, absorbed and melancholy …  In […]