Tag Archive: 0music

(Not) on Choir Tour

(Not) on Choir Tour

6th August 2020

This week I should have been singing at Ely Cathedral with a group of friends called the Pearce Singers, a choir which arose some years ago out of those of us who used to sing with Tring Parish Church Choir when we were growing up. Back in the 1980s and early 90s, we would go […]

Freischutzism

Freischutzism

8th July 2020

A few years ago, I wrote about an early piece of English lithographed music, from the 1820s. As I said at the time, British music publishers largely neglected lithography in the first four decades of the nineteenth century, but it did serve its purpose well for William Hawkes Smith’s privately-printed music with his own illustrations […]

Advent Calendar

Advent Calendar

17th June 2020

This post is part of a series on some of my compositions. You can read the first one here. I first came across Rowan Williams‘ poem ‘Advent Calendar’ in 2006, when my wife and I were expecting our first child, and I immediately knew I wanted to set it.  My idea in the setting was […]

The Greatest Refreshment

The Greatest Refreshment

10th June 2020

Having written a couple of blogposts recently on some translations of mine, I thought I would turn to my compositions, if nothing else than to document a little about them. To being at the beginning: my first choral work, The Greatest Refreshment, dates from 2005. It is dedicated to the memory of my grandfather, who […]

‘Both appalling and refreshing’

‘Both appalling and refreshing’

12th May 2020

This collection, The Catch Club (1733), brings together songs by a range of English Baroque composers—the vast majority by Henry Purcell (‘with over fifty pieces, almost his entire printed output in the genre’, Newman; no other composer wrote half as many), but Henry Aldrich, John Blow, Jeremiah Clarke, John Eccles, Henry Hall, Michael Wise etc. […]

From Germany to London, to America

From Germany to London, to America

15th April 2020

Many of the items in the Anglo-German Cultural Relations catalogue are rife with cross-cultural connections. One such item is the copy of John Frederick Lampe’s A plain and compendious Method of teaching Thorough Bass, after the most rational Manner … (London, J. Wilcox, 1737). This, the first (and only) edition was dedicated to Colonel John Blathwayt […]