Tag Archive: 0periodicals

Curtis’s Botanical Magazine

Curtis’s Botanical Magazine

15th January 2020

For those of you following our social media this week, you may have noticed a bit of a floral theme; more specifically, we have been posting a short series of botanical illustrations from William Curtis’s The Botanical Magazine: or, Flower-Garden displayed … (London, Fry & Couchman ‘for W. Curtis, at his Botanic Garden’, 1787). This […]

‘In the most fashionable colours’

‘In the most fashionable colours’

19th May 2016

At the London International Antiquarian Book Fair next week, I shall be featuring a number of books printed on coloured paper on my stand.  Here’s a sneak preview of one: The Semiquaver was a charming privately-printed magazine, produced in 1869–70, in which each issue was lithographed on a different shade of vibrantly coloured paper. The writer/editor was a […]

Taking pictures, talking pictures

Taking pictures, talking pictures

5th November 2015

Just over a year ago, I wrote about the first photographic manual in the world, written in 1839 by the Austrian writer Karl von Frankenstein (1810–1848).  I’d love to find another copy of that book, but I shall have to content myself for the moment with this, a complete run of the first year of a journal Frankenstein […]

Blood and laughter

Blood and laughter

21st May 2013

The boom years of 1890s Russia came to an abrupt halt at the turn of the century when an economic slump left many of the new urban working class jobless and led to unrest in the countryside.  The Tsar’s popularity took another knock when hopes of a quick military victory in the Russo-Japanese War (1904) […]

Cut out and kept

Cut out and kept

31st January 2012

In 1800, the Journal des Débats politiques et littéraires, one of the most important French newspapers, politically and intellectually, of the time (by the end of the Empire, it had 23,000 subscribers), was the first paper to introduce a feuilleton, to provide its readers with non-political news, reviews, criticism and gossip.  It was the brainchild […]