Tag Archive: 0textual transmission

A lost English novel

A lost English novel

2nd March 2016

Regular readers will know of my interest in the history of the reception of English literature abroad.  But I’ve never come across this before: a case of the translation preserving a text, when the English original is lost. This is the first edition in German of The Man of Honour, or the History of Harry Waters […]

A Dickensian Christmas

A Dickensian Christmas

16th December 2014

Everyone knows A Christmas Carol (1843), and perhaps other famous Christmas stories by Charles Dickens such as The Chimes (1844) and The Cricket on the Hearth (1845).  But Dickens wrote other Christmas tales, later in his career, the last of them being No Thoroughfare, written in collaboration with Wilkie Collins (who was then working on The Moonstone), which appeared as […]

Mystics and dandies

Mystics and dandies

2nd December 2014

As I wrote a couple of years ago, Oscar Wilde had a particular following in early twentieth-century Russia.  Here is another example: the first separate edition in Russian of The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), printed in Moscow in a limited edition of just 500 numbered copies in 1906. It is the first appearance of this translation.  Others […]

Three Men in a Boat encounter Russian pirates

Three Men in a Boat encounter Russian pirates

3rd September 2014

This year is the 125th anniversary of the first appearance of Three Men in a Boat, published by J. W. Arrowsmith in Bristol (who, three years later, was to bring out that other classic comic novel, George and Weedon Grossmith’s The Diary of a Nobody).  Although slated by some critics at the time, the book sold […]

Russia reads America

Russia reads America

9th January 2014

‘At the time of the October Revolution, the Russians based their conception of American culture on a combination of impressions derived from books of fact and fiction …  There was no dearth of facts about the United States, but there were huge quantities of misinformation and myth. ‘American literature in tsarist times had done little to […]

Byron in Russia

Byron in Russia

8th November 2013

‘Of all the countries which came under the spell of Byron’s pen and pageantry in the first half of the nineteenth century, none was more deeply entranced than Russia …  Certainly there was hardly a Russian poet in the romantic period who was not directly or indirectly influenced by Byron’s life and verse.  His name became […]