Tag Archive: 0Anglo-Russian

Kipling in Russia

Kipling in Russia

28th December 2015

Later this week sees the 150th anniversary of the birth of Rudyard Kipling (1865–1936).  So much has been written about Kipling, and his books, but there is very little published about his popularity in Russia, which began in the 1890s and continued well into the Soviet era. As far as I can work out, his first appearance […]

Moscow: an Ode

Moscow: an Ode

18th November 2015

A couple of months ago, I wrote about the novelist Barbara Hofland’s response to Napoleon’s invasion of Russia, Iwanowna; or, The Maid of Moscow.  I recently came across another piece of English literature inspired by the events in Russia, this time a poem by a Yorkshireman called William Margetson Heald (1767–1837), published the same year as Hofland’s […]

Sherwood the Faithful

Sherwood the Faithful

29th April 2015

Back in December 2013, I wrote about the ill-fated Decembrist Revolt.  What I hadn’t realised at the time was that the plot to stage the coup was uncovered by an Englishman, one John Sherwood (1798–1867). He was born in Greenwich, but left England as a child to go to Russia with his father, a mechanic who […]

A Dickensian Christmas

A Dickensian Christmas

16th December 2014

Everyone knows A Christmas Carol (1843), and perhaps other famous Christmas stories by Charles Dickens such as The Chimes (1844) and The Cricket on the Hearth (1845).  But Dickens wrote other Christmas tales, later in his career, the last of them being No Thoroughfare, written in collaboration with Wilkie Collins (who was then working on The Moonstone), which appeared as […]

A real horrorshow book

A real horrorshow book

22nd November 2013

Anthony Burgess died 20 years ago today, on 22 November 1993.  I think that happened to be the year I also read A Clockwork Orange for the first time.  As I was studying Russian, I was particularly drawn by Nadtsat, Burgess’s invented teenage slang (from the Russian suffix -nadtsat’, ‘-teen’): ‘horrorshow’ (from khorosho) for ‘good’; […]

English tricks for Russian children

English tricks for Russian children

8th October 2013

Something for Children’s Book Week: Magic Tricks.  By the six-year-old Samuel Hopkins (Moscow, 1911), published as a supplement to Svetliachok (“The Little Glow-worm”), a pre-Revolutionary children’s magazine aimed at 4–8-year-olds.  It recounts the conjuring abilities of a six-year-old English boy, Samuel Hopkins, with illustrated descriptions of some of his tricks so that the young reader might ‘pleasantly […]