Tag Archive: 0engraving

‘An artist full of charm and verve’

‘An artist full of charm and verve’

20th December 2017

Apologies for the recent lack of blog posts.  Things have been so busy: exhibiting at the Boston book fair, processing some recently acquired collections, trying to find someone to come and work for me, and preparing for California.  In cataloguing for the latter, here’s one little item which caught my eye: A small etched and […]

‘A refined image of disability’

‘A refined image of disability’

9th June 2017

The full caption reads: ‘ ‘This extraordinary young Man was born Dec.r 18. 1769, at Hook, in Hampshire, without Arms or Legs, as here delineated, occasioned as his Mother supposes by a Fright she suffered when pregnant with him.  Notwithstanding these Disadvantages he has by industry acquired the Arts of Writing & Drawing, holding his Pencil […]

A new audience for Pope

A new audience for Pope

11th December 2015

Alexander Pope’s brilliant mock-heroic poem, The Rape of the Lock (1714)—‘the most attractive of all ludicrous compositions’, as Samuel Johnson called it—has always been popular, and not just in England.  French translators, largely thanks to the efforts of Voltaire, first got hold of it, and it was through them that Pope gained a Continental audience.  (Voltaire always had praise […]

Handel goes big

Handel goes big

29th May 2013

This wonderful engraving comes from Charles Burney’s great Account of the Musical Performances in Westminster-Abbey, and the Pantheon, May 26th, 27th, 29th; and June the 3d, and 5th, 1784.  In Commemoration of Handel (1785).  The Handel Commemoration Concerts of 1784, marking the centenary of the composer’s birth, have been described as ‘in some ways the most […]

Overly (litho)graphic?

Overly (litho)graphic?

20th February 2013

Sometimes, as a bookseller, you come across something which you really can’t quite believe exists, and something that you will probably never see again.  Here is one such item, two leaves of occasional printing produced following the death of one Anna Maria Löffelholz von Colberg in 1727, when an enormous kidney stone, weighing 29½ loths […]

Famous last words

Famous last words

13th March 2012

     These extraordinary engravings are the last words written by Louis XVI (his will, Christmas Day, 1792) and his wife, Marie-Antoinette (a letter to her sister-in-law, 6 October 1793), turned into silhouettes, probably in the 1830s.  I’ll admit it took me a while to find out some information on the engraver, Alphonse Pélicier, who […]