Tag Archive: 0French

A bomb of a book

A bomb of a book

29th September 2016

As it’s Banned Books Week (and as this year the focus is ‘Celebrating Diversity’), I thought I’d post this: The Empire of the Czar; or, Observations on the social, political, and religious State of Prospects of Russia, made during a Journey through that Empire, the first edition in English of La Russie en 1839 (Paris, […]

Vive la France?

Vive la France?

14th July 2016

This scarce satirical etching, The Beaux Nurses, refers to the controversy and protest surrounding a French theatrical company, nicknamed the ‘French Strollers’, who applied for and were granted a licence to perform at the Haymarket in the winter of 1749.  Their arrival occasioned much discontent; as the Scots Magazine reported, they were ‘bitterly pelted in […]

The King was an hors d’œuvre

The King was an hors d’œuvre

12th May 2015

As regular readers of this blog will know, something I particularly like is cross-cultural material.  So this was a nice find: This is the first edition in English of the French Constitution of 1791, the first written constitution in France (based on the American model), and reluctantly accepted by Louis XVI.  It’s a very rare book. The […]

Reading in the heat

Reading in the heat

23rd July 2013

I’m always drawn to books for teaching children to read.  This one seems apt this week, with its being so hot: Calo et Lili apprennent à lire, a book specially designed for use in the French territories of the Pacific, published in Nouméa (the capital of the Melanesian island of New Caledonia) in 1962. Aside from the illustrations, by […]

Chanting the Revolution

Chanting the Revolution

16th July 2013

As it was Bastille Day recently, I thought I would share this.  It’s taken from a very rare little book called Recueil d’hymnes philosophiques, civiques et moraux, compiled by François-Nicolas Parent in around 1798.  Dedicated to those living in the countryside, this extraordinary work prints the texts of Republican songs, the ‘Marseillaise’ among them, with the music […]

Death Row journalism

Death Row journalism

28th February 2013

On the night of 19 March 1817, Antoine Fualdès, a former French procureur impérial, was brutally murdered in the town of Rodez, in the south-west corner of the Massif Central, and his body found floating in the Aveyron.  The ‘Affaire Fualdès’ as it became known and the subsequent six-month trial of the eight accused (Baptiste Colard […]