Tag Archive: 0Illustrated

Death Row journalism

Death Row journalism

28th February 2013

On the night of 19 March 1817, Antoine Fualdès, a former French procureur impérial, was brutally murdered in the town of Rodez, in the south-west corner of the Massif Central, and his body found floating in the Aveyron.  The ‘Affaire Fualdès’ as it became known and the subsequent six-month trial of the eight accused (Baptiste Colard […]

A black writer hits out

A black writer hits out

10th September 2012

This original watercolour illustration appears in a typescript copy of Pellobelle Tinkea gentilhomme de fortune, a powerful anti-assimilationist novel, set in West Africa, Europe and America 1915–19, which focuses on, among other things, the status of ‘author’ among African writers of the time, a status which was denied them.  The authors are given as Hippolyte and Prosper […]

Stickmen Shakespeare

Stickmen Shakespeare

3rd July 2012

Here’s fun: stickmen performing scenes from Shakespeare in 1824.  The artist, Thomas Bedford, was one of Bristol’s earliest lithographic printers (‘possibly the earliest’ according to Twyman, Early Lithographed Books, p. 150); he first appears listed as lithographer in 1823, so this is an early production of his.  The title is from Macbeth, but the other […]

The Archivist from Hell

The Archivist from Hell

30th May 2012

Here are two entertaining and highly imaginative satires, published in 1744 by the German writer Johann Friedrich Vetter, on the demise of France’s reputation during the War of the Austrian Succession: Das merckwürdige Leben, die sonderbare Kranckheit darauf erfolgter Tod und Begräbnuß der Französischen Reputation, welche zu dem allgrösten Leidwesen der Franzosen, mit einem noch niemal also gehaltenen […]

Entertaining the Tsar

Entertaining the Tsar

1st May 2012

2764 guests, at a cost of £13,188 2s. 1d. (over £600,000 in today’s money), this is Victorian event management at its peak.  Alexander II was visiting his daughter, Maria (styled here ‘Her Imperial and Royal Highness’, always a bone of contention with the British royal family), who had married Queen Victoria’s son, Alfred, at the […]

The Adventures of Congo

The Adventures of Congo

24th April 2012

The week before last I was in New York.  Last week I was back in England, and now it’s off to Paris on Thursday.  This children’s book has similar Anglo-American-French connections.  It’s the first edition in French (1826) of The Adventures of Congo in Search of his Master; an American Tale by the children’s writer Eliza Farrar. […]