Tag Archive: 0illustration

Countdown to California

Countdown to California

18th January 2019

Ladies and gents, the countdown has begun! If you follow us on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook you might be wondering why we’ve been posting photos of wobbly toys and flamboyant Italian men. The answer is, of course, because we can, but it is also because…

The new opportunities of lithography

The new opportunities of lithography

25th November 2016

I’m currently putting together a list on Music, to be sent out next week.  One item in particular brings together a number of things which interest me: a) music, b) illustration, c) lithography, d) provincial imprints, e) private printing: Lithography, as Michael Twyman notes, was largely neglected by British music publishers in the first four decades […]

Gushing and fabulous

Gushing and fabulous

16th December 2015

This is the first edition of a rare illustrated guide from 1682—in French, English, German, and Dutch—to Louis XIV’s Labyrinth at Versailles, a maze with thirty-nine fountains depicting Aesop’s fables. The Labyrinth began in 1665 as an unadorned hedge maze, but was later redesigned to serve the Dauphin’s education.  The impetus in this came from […]

A new audience for Pope

A new audience for Pope

11th December 2015

Alexander Pope’s brilliant mock-heroic poem, The Rape of the Lock (1714)—‘the most attractive of all ludicrous compositions’, as Samuel Johnson called it—has always been popular, and not just in England.  French translators, largely thanks to the efforts of Voltaire, first got hold of it, and it was through them that Pope gained a Continental audience.  (Voltaire always had praise […]

A cat-headed goblin

A cat-headed goblin

2nd December 2015

Published in 1844, this is a delightful illustrated tale of a mischievous goblin—‘in form as a small and dwarfish Man, but his Head was as that of a Cat’—who one night leads a miller, worse the wear for drink, through a stream, a thicket, and a bog, before leaving him breathless, tattered, and muddy come the morning.  […]

1001 Afternoons in Chicago

1001 Afternoons in Chicago

28th October 2015

I like this book: the first—and apparently only—edition in Russian of A Thousand and One Afternoons in Chicago (1922), one of the earliest books produced by the great screenwriter, Ben Hecht (1894–1964; Some like it hot, Gone with the Wind, Mutiny on the Bounty, etc.), himself the son of Russian–Jewish immigrants: ‘journalism extraordinary; journalism that invaded the realm […]