Tag Archive: 0publishing

Lovely litho

Lovely litho

9th December 2016

The past couple of weeks I have written about the opportunities offered by lithography to British musicians in the nineteenth century, and the problems they also encountered. One of the obvious benefits of the new medium was illustration, and a number of recent acquisitions set me thinking about this: This song was published c.1820, i.e. […]

Disappointed of Merseyside

Disappointed of Merseyside

2nd December 2016

Here’s rare book: the first (and probably only) edition of A Selection from the Music in use at the Church of St John the Divine Fairfield, privately printed in—presumably—a small number of copies, in 1858.  (This is Fairfield, Merseyside, by the way, not Connecticut.)  The compiler was one J. B. Cooper. The whole thing is […]

Songs for the pocket (and the pub)

Songs for the pocket (and the pub)

25th November 2015

I have a soft spot for glees, a peculiarly English genre of unaccompanied part-song which developed from the madrigal in the eighteenth century.  Percy Young, in his introduction to The English Glee, notes that ‘such music was in the first instance cultivated by lay clerks and vicars choral as respite from the rigours of professional […]

On m’accuse?

On m’accuse?

2nd July 2015

If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you will know that I am interested in the reception of Anglophone literature abroad, and of foreign literature in the English-speaking world.  One figure in this area who cannot be ignored is Henry Vizetelly (1820–1894), publisher, journalist, and editor, whose defiance of censorship and policy of issuing […]

Touring London’s bookshops, in 1807

Touring London’s bookshops, in 1807

11th June 2015

‘No one buys more books than booksellers.’  This was the advice given to those setting out in the trade at the inaugural York Antiquarian Book Seminar last year by the American bookseller, Lorne Bair.  Lorne was talking about old books, but I suspect that the same may well hold true for reference books, too.  I […]

American sympathy for the Bolsheviks

American sympathy for the Bolsheviks

23rd February 2015

‘Upton Sinclair seems to have been made to order for Russian readers in the early years of the Soviet regime.  Always topical and sharply provocative, he labored to expose the seamy side of American life, constantly hammering away at moral, social, economic, and political evil.  Ever sympathetic toward the underprivileged, and perpetually shocked by social […]