Tag Archive: 0russian

English tricks for Russian children

English tricks for Russian children

8th October 2013

Something for Children’s Book Week: Magic Tricks.  By the six-year-old Samuel Hopkins (Moscow, 1911), published as a supplement to Svetliachok (“The Little Glow-worm”), a pre-Revolutionary children’s magazine aimed at 4–8-year-olds.  It recounts the conjuring abilities of a six-year-old English boy, Samuel Hopkins, with illustrated descriptions of some of his tricks so that the young reader might ‘pleasantly […]

Song-collecting in Siberia: I

Song-collecting in Siberia: I

10th September 2013

20 Siberian folk-songs for solo voice with piano accompaniment from those collected in 1900 in the province of Irkutsk and the Transbaikal region by Nikolai Protasov …  Published … by the Song Commission of the Imperial Russian Geographical Society (1902).  The stunning chromolithographed cover was designed by V. P. Shneider. Nikolai Protasov (1865–1903), an active member […]

Blood and laughter

Blood and laughter

21st May 2013

The boom years of 1890s Russia came to an abrupt halt at the turn of the century when an economic slump left many of the new urban working class jobless and led to unrest in the countryside.  The Tsar’s popularity took another knock when hopes of a quick military victory in the Russo-Japanese War (1904) […]

Black Russian

Black Russian

22nd January 2013

The Jamican–American writer Claude McKay spent seven months in early Soviet Russia, 1922–3, where he was ‘feted like a celebrity’.  So it’s not surprising that his work was quickly translated into Russian, his poetry appearing regularly in translation from 1923 until well into the Thirties. This is a 1929 translation of the best-selling Home to Harlem (1928). […]

The First World War, from other sides

The First World War, from other sides

10th January 2013

Earlier this week, on my Facebook page, I posted the following picture: It’s an amazing photographic record of the First World War from the Serbian perspective, privately printed in Belgrade in 1926, compiled by a Lt-Col. Popović.  And it’s big: 316 × 450 mm, and about 450 pages.  A real slab of a book.  Naturally, it […]

1812

1812

4th December 2012

The most famous musical response to Napoleon’s defeat in Russia in December 1812 is, quite rightly, Tchaikovsky’s ‘1812 Overture’.  That was composed almost seventy years after the event, but there was also music written at the time to celebrate the Russian victory. This is A military song in honour of General Count Wittgenstein dedicated to […]