Tag Archive: 0satire

Far from Thanksgiving

Far from Thanksgiving

26th November 2014

I had quite a bit of interest when I wrote about this book over on The New Antiquarian, so thought I’d share it here, too.  I’ve written before about a fictitious Boston imprint.  That book had no obvious connection with the United States, but this one does: it’s an early satire on emigration to America, from 1818. […]

Blood and laughter

Blood and laughter

21st May 2013

The boom years of 1890s Russia came to an abrupt halt at the turn of the century when an economic slump left many of the new urban working class jobless and led to unrest in the countryside.  The Tsar’s popularity took another knock when hopes of a quick military victory in the Russo-Japanese War (1904) […]

The first book published in ‘California’

The first book published in ‘California’

22nd October 2012

This very rare book, a biting satire on Poland (its form of government, parliament, laws, military, society, women, dirtiness, duelling, etc.), is the first book to be published with a ‘California’ imprint, preceding the first book actually printed in California by over 50 years (Reglamento provicional, Monterey, 1834).  It was in fact printed in Berlin. […]

The Archivist from Hell

The Archivist from Hell

30th May 2012

Here are two entertaining and highly imaginative satires, published in 1744 by the German writer Johann Friedrich Vetter, on the demise of France’s reputation during the War of the Austrian Succession: Das merckwürdige Leben, die sonderbare Kranckheit darauf erfolgter Tod und Begräbnuß der Französischen Reputation, welche zu dem allgrösten Leidwesen der Franzosen, mit einem noch niemal also gehaltenen […]

Smashing stuff

Smashing stuff

21st February 2012

The Oxford Companion to German Literature describes Christian Ludwig Liscow (1701–1760) as ‘a lively and reckless satirist’.  This is surely one of his best books, a wonderful attack on Heinrich Jakob Sivers, ‘a bigoted publicity-seeking scrawler’ as the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie calls him, who reported having discovered a ‘musical stone’ (i.e. with musical notation on […]