Tag Archive: 0textual transmission

Washington Irving in Germany

Washington Irving in Germany

31st October 2013

Washington Irving’s name and fame reached Germany suddenly when in 1819–20 The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. was published in England and America.  Diedrich Knickerbocker’s History of New York (1809), which had appeared ten years earlier and had established Irving’s reputation as a writer, held no appeal for Europe.  Its native satire and its mockery […]

Cold War Frankenstein

Cold War Frankenstein

1st October 2013

Frankenstein (1818), Mary Shelley’s seminal novel, had to wait a long time before it finally appeared in Russian, published in Moscow in 1965, translated by Zinaida Aleksandrova.  But the date of its appearance makes it all the more interesting.  In the long introductory preface by Anna Elistratova, a leading Russian authority on English Romanticism (her […]

Printed for the invasion of Britain

Printed for the invasion of Britain

7th August 2013

In the summer of 1940, plans were afoot to invade Britain.  As part of those preparations, the central Nazi publishing house in Munich was printing an English-language edition of Hitler’s Mein Kampf, the only official unabridged English version.  The invasion never took place and this edition is now extremely rare: only 5 copies are recorded in libraries […]

An “American” novel

An “American” novel

31st July 2013

I’m always up for a challenge.  This book certainly proved to be one. The title reads: Emil Debo, “People of Gold.  An American Novel”.  But just who was Emil Debo?  And what was this book exactly?  The rendering of French in Russian always requires a bit of guesswork, but in the end I managed to […]

The wrongs of women, a novel

The wrongs of women, a novel

30th April 2013

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about a very rare German novel on the rights of women.  This is another rare German novel, published only the year before, in 1800, a translation of Mary Wollstonecraft’s important proto-feminist novel, The Wrongs of Woman.  This German version is translated via a French edition, Maria, ou Le malheur […]

‘Probably the strangest private press of all time’

‘Probably the strangest private press of all time’

23rd April 2013

As today is Shakespeare’s birthday(/deathday), I thought I’d post a rare piece of Shakespeareana: This little book, printed in Darmstadt in 1912 in an edition of only 200 copies, is the sixth book to be produced by ‘probably the strangest private press of all time’ (Horodisch). It was run by Gottlieb von Koch (1849–1914), a […]