Tag Archive: 0travel

Among Americans

Among Americans

16th June 2015

Later this week, I shall be travelling to Utah and Nevada, en route to the RBMS Preconference in Oakland, which I am again sponsoring this year.  I enjoy the chance to catch up with some of my American customers, and find out about current issues in the rare book library world.  A month or so ago I […]

Touring London’s bookshops, in 1807

Touring London’s bookshops, in 1807

11th June 2015

‘No one buys more books than booksellers.’  This was the advice given to those setting out in the trade at the inaugural York Antiquarian Book Seminar last year by the American bookseller, Lorne Bair.  Lorne was talking about old books, but I suspect that the same may well hold true for reference books, too.  I […]

Bibliotour

Bibliotour

23rd October 2014

The last couple of weeks have seen me in Germany and America, visiting book fairs, customers, and libraries.  I have always enjoyed the international nature of the book trade.  As regular readers of this blog will know, I have a particular interest in the cultural history of France, Germany, and Russia, especially in how these cultures […]

Crash-landed in North Carolina

Crash-landed in North Carolina

19th September 2014

A few weeks ago, I wrote about a fictitious Boston imprint from 1777.  Here’s something in the same vein, or so I first thought: a German novel from c.1789, written by Johann Wolfgang Andreas Schöpfel (1752–1827).  Inspired by the craze for balloon travel that hit Europe and America in the 1780s, it opens with a balloon flight from Versailles which ends […]

Love life

Love life

20th May 2014

This rather charming book, from 1857, is the first edition of the comic autobiography of a Scottish ‘packman’, or commercial traveller, whose travels around the British Isles include a sighting of Queen Victoria at Braemar Castle, and a visit to the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London.  The author was born in 1819, in very […]

A colourful account

A colourful account

31st January 2013

In 1843, a small party of engineers was sent from Belgium to study various British coal mines, in particular the English practice of tubbing (‘the lining of a pit-shaft or tunnel with a watertight casing’, OED).  The Belgians toured the country, covering some 1500 km thanks to the ‘admirable rail network’, from London to Sheffield, […]