Tag Archive: 0twentieth century

Countdown to California

Countdown to California

18th January 2019

Ladies and gents, the countdown has begun! If you follow us on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook you might be wondering why we’ve been posting photos of wobbly toys and flamboyant Italian men. The answer is, of course, because we can, but it is also because…

Rule, Britannia!  In Russia.

Rule, Britannia! In Russia.

1st September 2017

I’ve written before about First World War material on this blog (such as here and here), but even though there is a lot on the market you still come across things you’ve never seen before. Published around 1914, these little Russian song-sheets were both edited/arranged by Aleksandr Chernyavsky (1871–1942), a pianist and composer, particularly of […]

On the Road in Russia

On the Road in Russia

4th August 2017

‘The death of Stalin in 1953 brought about a gradual, partial relaxation of the terror that for decades had governed the attitudes of the Soviet populace, and particularly the intelligentsia.  At the height of the cold war, Soviet isolation from the West had been so complete and Soviet doctrine so rigid that genuine cultural contacts […]

Bloody satire

Bloody satire

8th November 2016

I was looking for something election-related for today’s blogpost.  I wrote about a couple of very nice items connected to the Russian 1906 (parliamentary) election a few years ago, but I don’t think I’ve shared this before: It’s a merciless (and rather bloodthirsty) satire of the Radical-Socialist Édouard Herriot and the Cartel des gauches during […]

Greasepaint

Greasepaint

6th September 2016

This is a copy of the first edition of The art of stage make-up.  A visual aid for members of drama groups, drama schools and professional actors by Nikolai Novliansky, with illustrations by Vadim Ryndin, a large book (252 × 362 mm) which details make-up designs for the stage from 1930. Novliansky worked at Aleksandr […]

Dioneo

Dioneo

18th August 2016

‘Dioneo’ was the nom de plume of Isaak Vladimirovich Shklovsky, a Russian journalist who lived in London from 1896 onwards and from where he became well known for his sketches of British life published in various Russian journals at the time.  A number of these sketches were then subsequently published as books, such as this […]