Tag Archive: 0Poetry

I’ve learned to live a life that’s simple

I’ve learned to live a life that’s simple

28th May 2020

As many of you may know, I also write choral music, and am always on the lookout for interesting texts to set. Early last year, a friend sent me an English translation of a poem she liked by Anna Akhmatova, thinking it may appeal. The translation didn’t rhyme and, curious, I went to find Akhmatova’s […]

Moral Songs for Children, translated from the German

Moral Songs for Children, translated from the German

27th February 2020

Also in our newly-released Anglo-German catalogue is a copy of the extremely rare first (and only) edition in English of a book by Christian Felix Weiße containing over 50 songs for children, an early appearance for a German children’s book in English.  It is also featured in our New York book fair list, available by […]

Dressed prints

Dressed prints

8th October 2019

One of our favourite reference books here in the office is Altered and Adorned by Suzanne Karr Schmidt, a fantastic look at how Renaissance prints were used in everyday life. An accompanying exhibition was put on by the Art Institute of Chicago in 2011. Something Karr Schmidt mentions in her study is the fashion for […]

Inscribed to Amelia Opie

Inscribed to Amelia Opie

28th November 2018

It’s Wednesday, and we’re having an Amelia Opie moment here at 84 The Broadway.  And why not?  She ticks all the boxes: Romantic novelist, abolitionist, pal of Sarah Siddons and Mary Wollstonecraft, married to a feminist, accomplished musician…the list goes on…

The Russian taste for Edgar Allan Poe

The Russian taste for Edgar Allan Poe

3rd June 2016

‘”Edgar Poe—the underground stream in Russia.”  So the Russian Symbolist poet Aleksandr Blok noted in his journal for November 6, 1911, a topic for a future critical study.  The article was never written, but the prospect has remained an enticing one.  For Poe’s fame, however clouded by conflicting interpretation, is of long standing in Russia’ […]

A new audience for Pope

A new audience for Pope

11th December 2015

Alexander Pope’s brilliant mock-heroic poem, The Rape of the Lock (1714)—‘the most attractive of all ludicrous compositions’, as Samuel Johnson called it—has always been popular, and not just in England.  French translators, largely thanks to the efforts of Voltaire, first got hold of it, and it was through them that Pope gained a Continental audience.  (Voltaire always had praise […]